1980's scrapbook                                                     

 

      ' a 1984 Tiger Cat huddle... Dieter Brock in

  his only season in Hamilton and last season in the

    CFL as a player gives out the orders.'

 

 

 

 

 

 

      

-- 1980 --

 

East: W L T F A Avg Att Most Outstanding Player Dieter Brock (Wpg)
Hamilton 8 7 1 332 377 24,350 Most Outstanding Canadian Gerry Dattilio (Mtl)
Montreal 8 8 0 356 375 32,441 Most Outstanding Defensive Player Dan Kepley (Edm)
Ottawa 7 9 0 353 393 24,083 Most Outstanding Lineman Mike Wilson (Edm)
Toronto 6 10 0 334 358 37,982 Most Outstanding Rookie William Miller (Wpg)
            Coach of the Year Ray Jauch (Wpg)
West:                
Edmonton 13 3 0 505 281 43,164 Playoffs Ott 21 @ Mtl 25
Winnipeg 10 6 0 394 387 25,040   Cgy 14 @ Wpg 32
Calgary 9 7 0 407 355 32,377   Mtl 13 @ Ham 24
BC 8 7 1 381 351 21,455   Wpg 24 @ Edm 34
Saskatchewan 2 14 0 284 469 24,582 Grey Cup Hamilton 10 Edmonton 48

   

Edmonton continued to dominate the league with a 13-3 record in front of 43,164 on average at Commonwealth Stadium. Dieter Brock led Winnipeg to a strong 2nd place finish in the West and was named the League’s Most Outstanding Player but the Ray Jauch led club would fall to Edmonton in the West Final. Calgary drew an impressive 32,377 for a 9 win season. Roy Dewalt arrived in BC abd showed promise while Saskatchewan limped to a 2-14 season that saw Ron Lancaster’s conclude 18 seasons as a Roughrider. Hamilton was the class of the East edging out Montreal who had strong play from Canadian pivot Gerry Datilio. Hamilton would make it all the way to the Grey Cup only to fall to the 3 in-a-row champions Edmonton Eskimos. Ottawa overcame the league’s worst defence to finish 7-9 while in Toronto the Forest Gregg, Tony Adams experiment ended in failure.

 

 

 

 


-- 1981 --

 

East: W L T F A Avg Att Most Outstanding Player Dieter Brock (Wpg)
Hamilton 11 4 1 414 335 25,166 Most Outstanding Canadian Joe Poplawski (Wpg)
Ottawa 5 11 0 306 446 19,666 Most Outstanding Defensive Player Dan Kepley (Edm)
Montreal 3 13 0 267 518 29,257 Most Outstanding Lineman Larry Butler (Wpg)
Toronto 2 14 0 241 506 33,219 Most Outstanding Rookie Vince Goldsmith
            Coach of the Year Joe Faragelli (Sask)
West:                
Edmonton 14 1 1 576 277 44,897 Playoffs Mtl 16 @ Ottawa 20
Winnipeg 11 5 0 517 299 27,300   BC 15 @ Wpg 11
B.C. 10 6 0 438 377 26,042   Ottawa 17 @ Ham 13
Saskatchewan 9 7 0 431 371 27,828   BC 16 @ Edm 22
Calgary 6 10 0 306 367 31,598 Grey Cup Edmonton 26 Ottawa 23

With a flurry in 1981 Nelson Skalbania arrived in Montreal and turned the football world on its ear. The Alouettes raided the NFL bringing aboard star pivot Vince Ferragamo, receiver James Scott and highly touted Miami 1st round running back David Overstreet. Media in the U.S. certainly took notice of Skalbania and his tactics, the airlift was a total failure Montreal managed just 3 wins as the immobile Ferragamo struggled to adjust to the Canadian game. Only Toronto was worse managing just 2 wins under coach Willie Wood. Ottawa finished the season with 5 wins as Oklahoma star J.C. Watts led a late season resurgence past first place Hamilton in the East final to almost an upset of Edmonton in the Grey Cup having jumped out to a 21 point lead Ottawa ended up losing as a late Dave Cutler field goal sealed Edmonton’s 4th straight championship. Edmonton lost 1 game the entire season as they continued their dominance. The Blue Bombers led by repeat Outstanding Player Dieter Brock (pictured) were upset by B.C. in the West semi-final. Joe Paopao led B.C. to a 10 win season, Saskatchewan had a strong season with 9 wins with Joe ‘747” Adams posting strong totals at QB. Calgary struggled to a last place finish.

 

-- 1982 --

 

East: W L T F A Avg Att Most Outstanding Player Condredge Holloway (Tor)
Toronto 9 6 1 426 426 38,426 Most Outstanding Canadian Rocky Dipietro (Ham)
Hamilton 8 7 1 396 401 19,299 Most Outstanding Defensive Player James Parker (Edm)
Ottawa 5 11 0 376 462 21,000 Most Outstanding Lineman Rudy Phillips (Ott)
Montreal 2 14 0 267 502 15,391 Most Outstanding Rookie Chris Isaac (Ott)
            Coach of the Year Bob O'Billovich (Tor)
West:                
Edmonton 11 5 0 544 323 57,901 Playoffs Ott 30 @ Ham 20
Winnipeg 11 5 0 444 352 28,596   Cgy 3 @ Wpg 24
Calgary 9 6 1 403 440 30,530   Ott 7 @ Tor 44
BC 9 7 0 449 390 25,151   Wpg 21 @ Edm 24
Saskatchewan 6 9 1 427 436 28,103 Grey Cup Toronto 16 Edmonton 32

Ralph Sazio did the unthinkable leaving the Tiger Cats to join the hated Toronto Argonauts front office. He brought along a new coach Bob O’Billovich and changed the losing culture in Toronto. The move worked as Toronto finished 1st and made it all the way to the Grey Cup at home. Condredge Holloway captured Leage Outstanding Player honors. Hamilton led by Outstanding Canadian Rocky Dipietro finished second in the East. QB phenom J.C. Watts took a year off of football and the Rough Riders struggled to just 5 wins, while Montreal languished with a Nelson Skalbania hangover finishing last. Edmonton showed some signs of vulnerability but again finished tied for 1st and captured a record 5 straight Grey Cup over Toronto. Winnipeg was strong equalling Edmonton in the regular season only to again fall to the Eskimos in the West final. Gerry Datilio was not the answer in Calgary with 22 interceptions. The Lions finished above .500 in their last season at Empire Stadium while Saskatchewan could not escape last place.

 

-- 1983 --

 

East: W L T F A Avg Att Most Outstanding Player Warren Moon (Edm)
Toronto 12 4 0 452 328 37,107 Most Outstanding Canadian Paul Bennett (Wpg)
Ottawa 8 8 0 384 424 23,197 Most Outstanding Defensive Player Greg Marshall (Ott)
Hamilton 5 10 1 389 498 17,000 Most Outstanding Lineman Rudy Phillips (Ott)
Montreal 5 10 1 367 447 23,156 Most Outstanding Rookie Johny Shepherd (Ham)
            Coach of the Year Cal Murphy (Wpg)
West:                
BC 11 5 0 477 326 45,551 Playoffs Ham 33 @ Ott 31
Winnipeg 9 7 0 412 402 24,614   Edm 22 @ Wpg 49
Edmonton 8 8 1 450 377 49,987   Ham 36 @ Tor 41
Calgary 8 8 0 425 378 25,684   Wpg 21 @ BC 39
Saskatchewan 5 11 1 360 536 26,194 Grey Cup Toronto 18 BC 17

With Hugh Campbell leaving the Eskimos in 1983, Jackie Parker took over as coach and the Eskimos suffered finishing in 3rd. Warren Moon was outstanding in his final season in the CFL throwing for a then record 5,648 yards. Paul Bennet led the Winnipeg defensive backfield as Winnipeg assumed their regular position in 2nd place. B.C. enjoyed the confines of their new stadium B.C. Place and finished 1st advancing to the Grey Cup in front of an average 45.551 home fans. Calgary matched their provincial rivals at 8-8 while Saskatchewan dealt with the departure of star receiver Joey Walters to the USFL. Toronto exorcised 52 years of frustration to capture the 1983 Grey Cup, Bob O’Billovich worked his quarterback platoon of Condredge Holloway and Joe Barnes to perfection with Barnes delivering the key pass to Cedric Minter to clinch the championship. J.C. Watts returned to Ottawa to lead the Rough Riders to a 2nd place finish. Hamilton’s porous defence resulted in just a 5 win season while Montreal as the Concordes could not escape last place.

 

-- 1984 --

 

East: W L T F A Avg Att Most Outstanding Player Willard Reaves (Wpg)
Toronto 9 6 1 461 361 32,754 Most Outstanding Canadian Nick Arakgi (Mtl)
Hamilton 6 9 1 353 439 15,884 Most Outstanding Defensive Player James Parker (BC)
Montreal 6 9 1 386 404 17,349 Most Outstanding Lineman John Bonk (Wpg)
Ottawa 4 12 0 354 507 21,720 Most Outstanding Rookie Dwaine Wilson (Mtl)
            Coach of the Year Cal Murphy (Wpg)
West:                
BC 12 3 1 445 281 42,354 Playoffs Mtl 11 @ Ham 17
Winnipeg 11 4 1 523 309 28,321   Edm 20 @ Wpg 55
Edmonton 9 7 0 464 443 40,980   Ham 14 @ Tor 13
Saskatchewan 6 9 1 348 479 24,661   Wpg 31 @ BC 14
Calgary 6 10 0 314 425 22,299 Grey Cup Hamilton 17 Winnipeg 47

Tom Clements and Willard Reaves (pictured) were dominant for Winnipeg as they edged B.C. to advance to the Grey Cup where they handily defeated former bomber Dieter Brock and the Tiger Cats. Don Matthews continued to work his magic with the B.C. Lions as Roy Dewalt and Mervyn Fernandez led the offence. Edmonton managed 9 wins in the post Warren Moon era with fresh faced Matt Dunigan leading the offence. Saskatchewan escaped the cellar with Joe Paopao at the helm. Calgary struggled to score points with hometown Greg Vavra under center as a rookie and finished last. Toronto survived any Grey Cup hangover with a 1st place finish only to be edged out by Dieter Brock and the Tiger Cats in the East final. Turner Gill at quarterback and Nick Arakgi receiving the ball led Montreal to 6 victories while Ottawa allowed the most points in the league on the way to finishing last.

 

 

 

 

 


-- 1985 --

 

East: W L T F A Avg Att Most Outstanding Player Mervyn Fernandez (BC)
Hamilton 8 8 0 377 315 14,992 Most Outstanding Canadian Paul Bennett (Ham)
Montreal 8 8 0 284 332 22,068 Most Outstanding Defensive Player Tyrone Jones (Wpg)
Ottawa 7 9 0 272 402 21,184 Most Outstanding Lineman Nick Bastaja (Wpg)
Toronto 6 10 0 344 397 29,057 Most Outstanding Rookie Mike Gray (BC)
            Coach of the Year Don Matthews (BC)
West:                
BC 13 3 0 481 297 42,336 Playoffs Ott 20 @ Mtl 30
Winnipeg 12 4 0 500 259 28,739   Edm 15 @ Wpg 22
Edmonton 10 6 0 432 373 41,927   Mtl 26 @ Ham 50
Saskatchewan 5 11 0 320 462 23,117   Wpg 22 @ BC 42
Calgary 3 13 0 256 429 15,394 Grey Cup Hamilton 24 BC 37

Mervyn Fernandez (pictured) was the League’ Most Outstanding Player as Don Matthews inventive offence got the best out of the big athletic receiver. An injury to Fernandez kept him out of the Grey Cup game but Dewalt found his replacement Ned Armour twice in a convincing win over Hamilton. Winnipeg behind the league’s best offence and best defence finished with 12 wins only to fall to the Lions in the West final. Edmonton battled to a 3rd place finish while Saskatchewan’s defence let them down. Calgary had one of the worst seasons in team history and struggled mightily at the gate. Hamilton and Montreal finished atop the East with .500 records, with Hamilton getting the upper hand in the East final. Ottawa rode the legs of J.C. Watts to 710 yards and 7 wins. Toronto slid to last as Condredge Holloway missed time due to injuries.

 

 
 
 
 
 

-- 1986 --

 

East: W L T F A Avg Att Most Outstanding Player James Murphy (Wpg)
Toronto 10 8 0 417 441 26,171 Most Outstanding Canadian Joe Poplawski (Wpg)
Hamilton 9 8 1 405 366 17,187 Most Outstanding Defensive Player James Parker (BC)
Montreal 4 14 0 320 500 10,587 Most Outstanding Rookie Harold Hallman (Cgy)
Ottawa 3 14 1 346 514 18,096 Coach of the Year Al Bruno (Ham)
               
West:             Playoffs Ham 17 @ Tor 31
Edmonton 13 4 1 540 365 40,098   Tor 25 @ Ham 42
BC 12 6 0 441 410 46,526   Wpg 14 @ BC 21
Winnipeg 11 7 0 545 387 26,873   Cgy 18 @ Edm 27
Calgary 11 7 0 484 380 27,286   BC 5 @ Edm 41
Saskatchewan 6 11 1 382 517 19,166 Grey Cup Hamilton 39 Edmonton 15

Matt Dunigan had the Edmonton Eskimo offence firing as the club finished with 13 wins. The Eskimos would advance all the way to the Grey Cup only to be upset by Hamilton. In B.C. an average of 46,526 watched James Parker (pictured) patrol linebacker to capture his 3rd Most Outstanding Defensive Player Award. Winnipeg was led my Most Outstanding Player in receiver James Murphy in the leagues top offence. Calgary rebounded from the bring with a ‘Save the Stamps” rally to post strong attendance totals and 11 wins. In Saskatchewan 6 wins was not enough to escape last place. Obie had the Argos back in first in Condredge Holloway’s final season with the club. Al Bruno led Hamilton to 2nd place in the season and an upset Grey Cup victory over Edmonton. It was sad to see Montreal limp to 4 wins and just over 10,000 fans and Ottawa struggled mightily and dealt J.C. Watts to Toronto midseason.

 

 

 

 

 


-- 1987 --

 

East: W L T F A Avg Att Most Outstanding Player Tom Clements (Wpg)
Winnipeg 12 6 0 554 409 26,841 Most Outstanding Canadian Scott Flagel (Wpg)
Toronto 11 6 1 484 427 27,395 Most Outstanding Defensive Player Greg Stumon (BC)
Hamilton 7 11 0 470 509 16,999 Most Outstanding Rookie Gil Fenerty (Tor)
Ottawa 3 15 0 377 598 18,351 Coach of the Year Bob O'Billovich (Tor)
               
West:             Playoffs Ham 13 @ Tor 29
BC 13 4 1 540 365 36,514   Cgy 16 @ Edm 30
Edmonton 12 6 0 441 410 33,581   Tor 19 @ Wpg 3
Calgary 11 7 0 545 387 24,205   Edm 31 @ BC 7
Saskatchewan 11 7 0 484 380 24,033 Grey Cup Edmonton 38 Toronto 36

For the 1st time as the CFL the league had just 8 teams as Montreal folded days before the start of the season. Tom Clements concluded his hall of fame career with his finest season and was named the league’s Most Outstanding leading Winnipeg to a 12-6 record. The Argonauts unearthed a gem from little known Holy Cross College In running back Gil Fenerty (pictured) who burst onto the scene scoring 15 touchdowns to lead the Argonauts to a 11-6-1 2nd place record. A speed demon in Earl Winfield arrived in Steeltown and would delight fans for over a decade. Ottawa with the worst offence and worst defence finished last. B.C. rode a suffocating defence to 1st place in the West. Edmonton had a strong season as Matt Dunigan and Damon Allen teamed up at quarterback including the Grey Cup on a last second field goal win over Toronto. Calgary and Saskatchewan proved the West’s dominance in a tie for 3rd with 11 win seasons.

 

 

 

 


-- 1988 --

 

East: W L T F A Avg Att Most Outstanding Player David Williams (BC)
Toronto 14 4 0 571 326 23,156 Most Outstanding Canadian Ray Elgaard (Sask)
Winnipeg 9 9 0 407 458 24,858 Most Outstanding Defensive Player Grover Covington (Ham)
Hamilton 9 9 0 478 465 14,756 Most Outstanding Rookie Orville Lee (Ott)
Ottawa 2 16 0 278 618 20,407 Coach of the Year Mike Riley (Wpg)
               
West:             Playoffs Ham 28 @ Wpg 35
Edmonton 11 7 0 477 408 30,746   BC 42 @ Sask 18
Saskatchewan 11 7 0 525 452 25,450   Wpg 27 @ Tor 11
BC 10 8 0 489 417 32,105   BC 37 @ Edm 19
Calgary 6 12 0 395 476 21,936 Grey Cup Winnipeg 22 BC 21

The Argonauts had finished 14-4 the clubs most wins in a season in franchise history as Gilbert Renfroe and Gil Fenerty led the way. Mike Riley led Winnipeg to a 9 win season – and then to a surprise upset of Toronto and a Grey Cup Championship over Edmonton. Hamilton only drew 14,756 on average to watch Grover Covington terrorize opposing quarterbacks. Ottawa had an outstanding season from rookie Canadian running back Orville Lee but managed just 2 wins. Matt Dunigan moved to the Lions in a multi-player trade and had a big impact leading B.C. to 10 wins and receiver David Williams to a MOP award. The Lions came within a tipped pass away from a Grey Cup championship as Winnipeg pulled out a late victory in Ottawa. Edmonton moved forward. Edmonton found their way to 11 victories with Damon Allen and Tracy Ham sharing quarterbacking duties. Saskatchewan finished strong with 11 victories led by the quarterback tandem of Kent Austin and Tom Burgess (pictured). Calgary had just 6 wins with the league’s worst offence.

 

 

 

 


-- 1989 --

 

East: W L T F A Avg Att Most Outstanding Player Tracy Ham (Edm)
Hamilton 12 6 0 519 517 17,278 Most Outstanding Canadian Rocky Dipietro (Ham)
Toronto 7 11 0 369 428 35,109 Most Outstanding Defensive Player Danny Bass (Edm)
Winnipeg 7 11 0 408 462 24,160 Most Outstanding Rookie Stephen Jordan (Ham)
Ottawa 4 14 0 426 630 18,505 Coach of the Year John Gregory (Sask)
               
West:             Playoffs Wpg 30 @ Tor 7
Edmonton 16 2 1 644 302 30,841   Sask 33 @ Cgy 26
Calgary 10 8 0 495 466 22,000   Wpg 10 @ Ham 14
Saskatchewan 9 9 0 547 567 24,176   Sask 32 @ Edm 21
BC 7 11 0 521 557 31,795 Grey Cup Saskatchewan 43 Hamilton 40

The 1989 CFL season will always carry the moniker ‘Riders 89’. Saskatchewan had a magical playoff run culminating in a last second victory on a Dave Ridgway field goal in widely regarded as the greatest CFL game ever. With just 9 wins Saskatchewan upset first Calgary and then the 16-2 Edmonton Eskimos to advance to the Grey Cup. Tracy Ham (pictured)  was all-world for Edmonton and captured the Most Outstanding Player Award. Calgary had a strong season with 10 wins as Danny Barrett solidified the quarterbacking role. The Lions slumped from a near Grey Cup victory to just 7 wins. Hamilton under Al Bruno dominated the East division and fought Saskatchewan to the final seconds in the Grey Cup. Toronto adjusted to life in the Skydome with 7 victories as Michael ‘Pinball’ Clemons was added to Gil Fenerty in the Argo backfield. Winnipeg had just 7 victories to follow their Grey Cup championship in 1988. Ottawa had the league’s worst defence and finished with the league’s worst record.

 

 

 

 


 

 

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